Hispanic Attitudes Toward Learning English

June 7, 2006

Via Pew Hispanic Center

Hispanics by a large margin believe that immigrants have to speak English to be a part of American society and even more so that English should be taught to the children of immigrants, according to recent surveys conducted by the Pew Hispanic Center.

The endorsement of the English language, both for immigrants and for their children, is strong among all Hispanics regardless of income, party affiliation, fluency in English or how long they have been living in the United States.

The Pew Hispanic Center, in collaboration with the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, probed attitudes toward the English language in public opinion surveys conducted in 2003 and 2004. In one of these surveys, Latinos were asked whether they think immigrants have to speak English to say they are a part of American society. In another they were asked whether teaching English to immigrant children is very important, somewhat important, not too important or not important on all.

A clear majority of Latinos (57%) believe that immigrants have to speak English to be a part of American society while a significant minority (41%) says that they do not. Latino immigrants are slightly more likely (57%) to say that immigrants have to learn English than native-born Latinos (52%). The view that immigrants have to learn English is held by a majority of Latinos regardless of how much money they make or their level of education, according to the 2004 National Survey of Latinos: Politics and Civic Education.

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